MxMo Garnish Part 3: Tiki Theatrics, Fire

There’s Fire! We have reached the third and final part of our Tiki Theatrics experiment, but I couldn’t end this overview without taking a look at a signature Tiki trick. That means playing with fire for yours truly. Thanks again to Joseph of Measure and Stir and MxMo for making this happen.

 

Like smoking drinks this is pretty easy if your set up right and take good safety precautions. I chose not to attempt a flaming coffee grog in favor of the much safer flaming lime shell.

What You’ll need

Juiced limes

A melon baller

A lighter

Small bits of toast

A small Tupperware dish

Cheapo Bacardi 151

Gloves

Bamboo skewers

A tiki cocktail

 

First take the small bits of toast and submerge them in a small tupperware dish with the Bacardi. I like Cruzan’s 151, but flaming is the only reason I keep Bacardi around. Now take your spent lime shell and clean it out with the melon baller. Place one of the well soaked toasts and about a half teaspoon of the 151 into the spent lime shell and carefully float that in the drink. Light the tip of a long bamboo skewer and hold it in a gloved hand before using the lit tip of the skewer (Or long match) to light the shell.

 

It’ll sizzle for quite awhile unless you blow it out. And It’s super gnarly to see the flames lick up from your cocktail. Sadly my flash hid a great deal of the flame. So I included a few shots without it. I find it’s easier to float lime shells on blended drinks with more slush consistency. Thusly I bring you this New Orleans inspired after dinner dessert sipper.

 

Geaux Nuts

Ingredients

1 ½ oz Old New Orleans 3 year

¾ oz Fresh Lime Juice

1 ¾ oz Coconut Cream

1 oz Hoodoo Chicory Liqueur

2 dashes Angostura

1 ½ cup Crushed ice

Blend for 12 seconds on high and poor into a coconut mug or double old fashioned glass and garnish with a flaming lime shell.

 

The coconut provides a creamy sweet body for this drink while the lime keeps it in balance. I really enjoy Old New Orleans chocolatey molasses like notes as well as the nutty coffee notes of the chicory liqueur. It’s even better as it sits for awhile and warms abit letting the flavors come to the forefront. A nice way to linger after a meal and replace your dessert with some adult candy.

 

Of course we’ve only scratched the surface. Everything from mugs, dancing girls, to the environment the drinks are served in adds to the theatrics of Tiki. But these theatrical garnishes can be used to create truly memorable experiences for friends and guests that will surely create conversation and atmosphere. Please remember whenever working with fire, and dry ice to do so safely and soberly.

 

We’d like to thank our host Measure and Stir for a great MxMo, and we’d like to encourage you to read parts 1 and 2 if you haven’t already. We’ll be taking a little break to get ready for the holiday drinking season, so until next time…

 

You get hammered America! – JFL

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About JFL

Joey or JFL as he is known by friends is a culinary trained mixologist from the Heart of Dixie Birmingham, Alabama. From a weekly column in the St. Clair News Aegis to his own experiments online JFL never stops doing work on Tiki and Cocktails. When he's not studying all things spirit, wine, and beer he's pursuing his own odd interests such as cartoons, cheesy old horror movies, horror punk, hair metal, and hockey
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7 Responses to MxMo Garnish Part 3: Tiki Theatrics, Fire

  1. Pingback: MxMo Garnish Part 2: Tiki Theatrics, Smoke | Rated R Cocktails

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